Archive for February, 2009

Bacon is BACK! A day late, a strip short.

February 28, 2009

Yes I know, I started Bacon Fridays, and then promptly dropped it when my time was not my own.  I am BACK!  BACON is back!

One night this week, I got home and was mildly irritated at myself to discover that i really had no food in the house.  Fortunately for myself, I had a half open bottle of wine and the basic food groups –

  • pancake mix
  • butter
  • syrup
  • BACON!

Sometimes, you just need to have breakfast for dinner!  I also found blueberries and bananas in my bag of tricks, so I cooked up a stack of pancakes and some applewood smoked bacon.

After pouring myself a glass of Calaveras County Syrah, I added the requisite butter and pure maple syrup to my pancakes.  IN the process, the syrup sneaks up on the bacon.  The taste sensation that maple syrup drenched bacon provided is, in a word, orgasmic.

Add in a smokey, blueberry infused syrah, and I was in love.  Pure love.

Everyone should have blueberry pancakes, bacon, and syrah for dinner soon!  P.S.  i recommend the warm climate syrah over a cool climate syrah as it has the fruity smokiness that pairs well with pancakes and bacon.  Cool climate syrah is equally delicious for other reasons, and would go well with meaty dishes including bacon.

Happy short stack to you!

Hospitali-teed off!

February 24, 2009

This weekend, I was fortunate enough to find myself in Napa, celebrating Lisa’s (@winedivergirl) housewarming.  Since I was staying the night, we had planned to go wine tasting the next day with our friend Brian from The Roger Smith Hotel (@bsimi), who was visiting from New York. When we got going on the rainy winter Sunday, we opted to start with some bubbles, so Lisa took us on over to Domaine Chandon.  Now, I know this winery well.  I have been there many times.  I buy their sparklers int he grocery store – a LOT. 

As we pulled in to the winery, the river passing through the property was a bit wild, which really should have warned us of the impending visit.  As we walked through the retail store, several employees were milling about,  did greet us on entry.  As we made our way upstairs, we saw that while the tasting bar was hopping, it was not busy.  I did see immediately, that there were only 2 employees working the whole bar – which normally would not be surprising, but if you’ve seen this tasting bar, you can easily line up 25 people along the perimeter.

Ok fine, so they were short staffed.  I thought, no problem, there is an opening at the bar, so we’ll side up and look at the menu, assuming the bartender will come by at some point.  And bartender is what they are – Chandon does not offer traditional tastings, but instead offers flights of 2 different sparkling levels, still wines, as well as champagne cocktails.  Having decided on our beverages, we tried to flag down one of the two staff members for assistance.  NO such luck.  We stood.  We waited.  We waited some more.

15 minutes in to this, we mutually decided to high tail it out of there.  Now I know that as an industry rep, a wine blogger, and a hotel beverage manager, we might have high expectations for customers service, but this was just RIDICULOUS.  To not even acknowledge our presence with a simple “I’ll be right with you” set me over the edge. What made this experience worse was that as we walked out, the Chatty Cathys in the retail shop didn’t even say goodbye, or why are you leaving, or anything.  They just ignored us.

Meanwhile, as we headed over to micro winery Elizabeth Spencer, we were fuming.  Inside the tiny tasting room, everything about our day began to change.  We were greeted.  We were smiled at.  We were talked to.  Vanessa INTERACTED with us.  Once she found out we were tradespeople, she asked us about what we did.  She showed me a very cool iPhone app, and she talked to us about the wines.  This experience was so lovely, Lisa even joined the wine club!  I bought a bottle of syrah.  Oh and the wine was delicious!

Feeling redeemed, we even ventured over to Rubicon Estate.  Known for it’s outrageous tasting fees but beautiful grounds, we were at once welcomed by the greeter.  Even after we asked for their trade tasting policy, they treated us as valued guests.  OK< so the guy at the tasting bar was a little stiff, but his coworker truly appreciated my rubber chicken and her escapades.  After Rubicon and some lunch, we made another stop, this time at Miner Family Wines.  While Miner was serviceable, we were basically abandoned after we identified ourselves as members of the trade.  While I realize that many tasting rooms recoup costs by charging for tastings, I feel that $25 is excessive.  If I can avoid paying for a tasting fee by utilizing my connections, that is $25 more i can spend on wine.  Wouldn’t you rather have me buy wine and tell my friends about it then ignore us for the sake of a few bucks that day?

OK now I know they are less likely to get us to buy wine on the first visit, or join the wine club.  But the last time i checked, my American Excess card was just as good as someone else’s.  This is a rookie mistake, because if i were buying for a party or for a hotel, i would certainly not want to buy their wine, based solely on this experience.

Just a note to you winery reps out there – the moral of this story is that one ounce of great service like Elizabeth Spencer, is worth 100 pounds of gold in FREE marketing.  I am telling everyone I know about Elizabeth Spencer, and that they need to go there and talk to Vanessa.  I am also telling everyone to run screaming from Chandon, since you can go to Safeway to get the wines and have a better experience.

Clearly Chandon doesn’t get it.  Clearly Elizabeth Spencer does.  Kudos for the latter for understanding how to treat it’s customers, whether we buy today, tomorrow or not at all.  Apparently, this is somewhat rampant at other established sparkling houses – see Shana’s post on Korbel!

Open that Bottle already!

February 24, 2009

Have you ever wanted an excuse to open a special bottle of wine you have been holding on to, but just can’t quite bring yourself to crack?  Now is your chance!

Saturday, February 28th, marks the annual Open That Bottle Night celebration, an event started by that wine writing couple from the Wall Street Journal – Dorothy J. Gaiter and John Brecher. In the late 1990s, OTBN was born as an opportunity encourage their readers not to be intimidated by their wine, and to open a significant bottle and share their stories.

Since wine blogging has exploded int he last year or so, I am partnering with Vinquire (my other wine obsession) and Wilson Daniels, along with twitter Taste Live, to open some tasty treats and share with you.  Wilson Daniels is a full services sales & marketing company, which represents brands from throughout the US as well as internationally.  Having worked with them on Passion for Pinot as well as this event, I am impressed by their quality of product as well as service.  Check them out!

I will be blending wine earlier in the day, but around 6pm PT / 9pm ET, please join me on Twitter (@vinquire) to hear about the following wines, generously provided by Wilson Daniels.  If you can’t play along, check out The Jug Shop or your favorite retailer, and participate from your sofa, easy chair, or corkage free restaurant!  If you are having trouble locating the wines, please click the links below, which will take you to our Vinquire search page.

Hope you can all join us!  By the way, I found out about a nifty new Twitter tool.  Have you tried Tweet Grid?  This cool little app lets you follow along with hashtags like #ttl.  It auto refreshes too!

Jumping frogs, Twisted wines, and Sneaky Syrah

February 19, 2009

Who needs romantic candlelit dinners?  Who needs chocolate and sweet nothings?  Not me.  I had a much better Valentine’s Day weekend, spend slurping the good stuff in one of the hottest new wine regions of California, Calaveras County.

My first visits to this area were whizzing by Douglas Flat on the way to go skiing at Bear Valley or Dodge Ridge.  Then, as I got older, we would take summer trips to Sonora and Jackson to learn about the Gold Rush history.   Last fall, however, my eyes were opened when I took my first trip to Murphys to go wine tasting.  I had my first taste of wine from this area, and fell in love.

First, a little history, just so I can shake off all of you lurkers and get the real readers in here.  OK just kidding!  The name Calaveras is Spanish for “skulls”, which is probably from the bones found by the Spanish Captain, Gabriel Moraga.  Calaveras County also gained notieraity when Mark Twain wrote the short storyThe Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County“.  The area was settled

The town of Murphys, with some 15 tasting rooms on Main Street, was settled during the Gold Rush by – spoiler alert – brothers Daniel and John Murphy.  They ran the local supply store, where they became rich off of the prospectors who needed supplies. Now, with it’s cluster of tasting rooms on a short meander, Murphys’ tasting rooms take you on a history walk through town, while enjoying some fabulous wine.

Wine has been made in these parts since the late 1800s, to supply the growing towns and miners with their elixirs.  Much like Amador County, immigrants brought the wine making techniques with them.  While certain other areas of the state are more well known, I think that Calaveras County will continue to grow (but not too much) and develop in to a wine power, while maintaining it’s small town charm.  This area is idea for growing Spanish and Rhone varietals, as it is very hot and dry in the summer, with snow and true winter in the later months.  As such, we tasted several Viogniers, Grenaches and Syrahs.  There is also a long history of Zinfandel being grown in these parts, and the oldest known zin planting is a 110 year old vineyard producing some potent juice!  Part of the allure of Murphys is that the tasting rooms are intimate, it’s rarely crowded (except for a bad experience with a bus of retirees from Modesto), the people are genuinely happy to see you, and there are great wines at amazing prices.  Have I mentioned that most wineries do not charge a tasting fee?  If they do, it’s rarely more than a few dollars and worth every cent.

Some fothe highlights of my weekend were:

  • Twisted Oak Presidents in Lust Dinner – This dinner, which humorously combines Presidents Day with Valentines Day, offered scrumptious treats by Sugar & Spice Catering in Jackson, paired with the best of Twisted Oak’s library wines.  My favorite pairing of the night was the Chipolte Tomato Bisque served with the 2004 Grenache.  It’s true, I have left my heart at Twisted Oak!
  • Tanner Vineyards – Tanner shares the supreme talents of Scott “Fermento the Magnificent” Klann, Twisted Oak’s winemaker and resident cool dude.  Tanner makes outstanding Syrah from thier own vineyard, as well as Petite Verdot and a Rhone blend called Mélange de Mère, a blend of Syrah, Petite Sirah, and Petite Verdot.
  • Lavender Ridge – is located in a historical storefront on Main Street, and offers cheese pairings with their wine.  I really enjoyed their Viognier paired with a nice triple creme!
  • Broll Mountain – some new friends that Brix Chick Liza and I met at ZAP work part time at the Broll tasting room, and we popped in to see them. Why hadn’t I popped in before!  Another great example of Sierra Foothills syrah.
  • Chatom – is slightly outsideo f town, near the Twisted Oak winery in Vallecito.  I had to drag Liza in there, but it was well worth it for the live music and wines in they were pouring.  The She Wines Red, a nice red blend, was a great every day wine for less than $10.
  • Ironstone (reserve selections only) – this behemouth is a huge event center, but if you stick to the reserve table, I found some gems.  I really liked the Christine Andrew Chard, and with the sale price of a whopping $11.99, I should have taken home more.  The Reserve Old Vine Zin from Lodi was what our hostess Shoshona referred to as a “dirty wine”, which was deep, dark, rich and filled with chocolate covered cherries.  I would reccomend a trip to Ironstone for a taste of these wines.  Their regular line is average and affordable, but these reserve wines are speical and offer amazing QPR.
  • Renner – is the newest kid on the block.  We hit them on a whim on the way back down 4.  Renner is located in a faux old west style town, in Copperopolis.  As we pulled in, we had the tasting room to ourselves, and were happy to discover that they own the Canterbury Vineyard where the viognier we had with dinner the night before came from.  They also make 2 syrahs that were wonderful, and were offering one of the syrahs by the case for $9 a bottle.  If we’re looking at QPR here, this one is out of this world.  For a weeknight sipper, this is a steal so walk, don’t run.  The regular price is still affordable at $18, but this special sprice was stunning.

As we wrapped up our wine soaked weekend, I had amassed quite a collection of wine, but it was very easy on the wallet.  First off, you are not paying for Napa real estate so wineires are able to pass that savings on to the cosumer.  Additionally, in conjunction with the event weekend, we were able to get several “special sales” and allowed us to buy more wine!

Thank you Murphys for a fantastic sweekend, and can’t wait tos ee you nex ttime.

Jumping frogs, Twisted wines, and Sneaky Syrah

February 19, 2009

Who needs romantic candlelit dinners?  Who needs chocolate and sweet nothings?  Not me.  I had a much better Valentine’s Day weekend, spend slurping the good stuff in one of the hottest new wine regions of California, Calaveras County.

My first visits to this area were whizzing by Douglas Flat on the way to go skiing at Bear Valley or Dodge Ridge.  Then, as I got older, we would take summer trips to Sonora and Jackson to learn about the Gold Rush history.   Last fall, however, my eyes were opened when I took my first trip to Murphys to go wine tasting.  I had my first taste of wine from this area, and fell in love.

First, a little history, just so I can shake off all of you lurkers and get the real readers in here.  OK just kidding!  The name Calaveras is Spanish for “skulls”, which is probably from the bones found by the Spanish Captain, Gabriel Moraga.  Calaveras County also gained notieraity when Mark Twain wrote the short storyThe Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County“.  The area was settled

The town of Murphys, with some 15 tasting rooms on Main Street, was settled during the Gold Rush by – spoiler alert – brothers Daniel and John Murphy.  They ran the local supply store, where they became rich off of the prospectors who needed supplies. Now, with it’s cluster of tasting rooms on a short meander, Murphys’ tasting rooms take you on a history walk through town, while enjoying some fabulous wine.

Wine has been made in these parts since the late 1800s, to supply the growing towns and miners with their elixirs.  Much like Amador County, immigrants brought the wine making techniques with them.  While certain other areas of the state are more well known, I think that Calaveras County will continue to grow (but not too much) and develop in to a wine power, while maintaining it’s small town charm.  This area is idea for growing Spanish and Rhone varietals, as it is very hot and dry in the summer, with snow and true winter in the later months.  As such, we tasted several Viogniers, Grenaches and Syrahs.  There is also a long history of Zinfandel being grown in these parts, and the oldest known zin planting is a 110 year old vineyard producing some potent juice!  Part of the allure of Murphys is that the tasting rooms are intimate, it’s rarely crowded (except for a bad experience with a bus of retirees from Modesto), the people are genuinely happy to see you, and there are great wines at amazing prices.  Have I mentioned that most wineries do not charge a tasting fee?  If they do, it’s rarely more than a few dollars and worth every cent.

Some fothe highlights of my weekend were:

  • Twisted Oak Presidents in Lust Dinner – This dinner, which humorously combines Presidents Day with Valentines Day, offered scrumptious treats by Sugar & Spice Catering in Jackson, paired with the best of Twisted Oak’s library wines.  My favorite pairing of the night was the Chipolte Tomato Bisque served with the 2004 Grenache.  It’s true, I have left my heart at Twisted Oak!
  • Tanner Vineyards – Tanner shares the supreme talents of Scott “Fermento the Magnificent” Klann, Twisted Oak’s winemaker and resident cool dude.  Tanner makes outstanding Syrah from thier own vineyard, as well as Petite Verdot and a Rhone blend called Mélange de Mère, a blend of Syrah, Petite Sirah, and Petite Verdot.
  • Lavender Ridge – is located in a historical storefront on Main Street, and offers cheese pairings with their wine.  I really enjoyed their Viognier paired with a nice triple creme!
  • Broll Mountain – some new friends that Brix Chick Liza and I met at ZAP work part time at the Broll tasting room, and we popped in to see them. Why hadn’t I popped in before!  Another great example of Sierra Foothills syrah.
  • Chatom – is slightly outsideo f town, near the Twisted Oak winery in Vallecito.  I had to drag Liza in there, but it was well worth it for the live music and wines in they were pouring.  The She Wines Red, a nice red blend, was a great every day wine for less than $10.
  • Ironstone (reserve selections only) – this behemouth is a huge event center, but if you stick to the reserve table, I found some gems.  I really liked the Christine Andrew Chard, and with the sale price of a whopping $11.99, I should have taken home more.  The Reserve Old Vine Zin from Lodi was what our hostess Shoshona referred to as a “dirty wine”, which was deep, dark, rich and filled with chocolate covered cherries.  I would reccomend a trip to Ironstone for a taste of these wines.  Their regular line is average and affordable, but these reserve wines are speical and offer amazing QPR.
  • Renner – is the newest kid on the block.  We hit them on a whim on the way back down 4.  Renner is located in a faux old west style town, in Copperopolis.  As we pulled in, we had the tasting room to ourselves, and were happy to discover that they own the Canterbury Vineyard where the viognier we had with dinner the night before came from.  They also make 2 syrahs that were wonderful, and were offering one of the syrahs by the case for $9 a bottle.  If we’re looking at QPR here, this one is out of this world.  For a weeknight sipper, this is a steal so walk, don’t run.  The regular price is still affordable at $18, but this special sprice was stunning.

As we wrapped up our wine soaked weekend, I had amassed quite a collection of wine, but it was very easy on the wallet.  First off, you are not paying for Napa real estate so wineires are able to pass that savings on to the cosumer.  Additionally, in conjunction with the event weekend, we were able to get several “special sales” and allowed us to buy more wine!

Thank you Murphys for a fantastic sweekend, and can’t wait tos ee you nex ttime.

I don't taste and tell, except for you!

February 18, 2009

As some of you might know, I am trying to be a winemaker.  No, I don’t have carboys set up in the garage, and no I’m not living in the lap of luxury in Sonoma.  I am lucky enough to live in a city that has it’s own community custom crush facility, Crushpad.

I am part of a winemaking crew where I am making a Dry Creek zinfandel with a group of people, which is one of the great services Crushpad offers.  We were blending our finished zin with a variety of components, and we were able to decide how we wanted our finished product to come out.  Initially, we tried the control sample of our 2007 Grist Vineyard Zinfandel, which is a jammy, bright, and powerful zin.  Then, we tried a control sample of some petite sirah.  Once we tasted the components, we were able to think about what proportion of Petite Sirah we wanted to add to our zin, which we were hoping would add some depth of flavor, as well as a little backbone.

First, we tried a 5% Petite Sirah and 95% Zinfandel blend.  We all agreed that this was too much, as the Petite overpowered the subtlety of the zinfandel and we lost it’s character.  Then, our consulting winemaker Kian Tavakol suggested we try a different Zinfandel.  This zin was from the Beatty Ranch on Howell Mountain in Napa.  This vineyard is at 1800 feet and offers a completely different experience from Dry Creek.  These wines have a deeper black fruit and chocolate overtone, which is absolutely amazing.  I had a sample side by side with the Grist, and while totally different, they were both amazing.

Now that we had tried the control samples, a 5% blend, and a new zinfandel, we mixed it up by adding some of the Beatty Ranch zin to the mix.  Kian guided us to do a 2.5% Beatty Ranch Zin, 2.5% Petite Sirah, and 95% Grist Zin blend, which allowed us to keep our vineyard designate on the label.  We also tried another blend, which had a bit less Petite Sirah, but no Beatty zin.  The first test was not blind, and we were having a hard time deciding what we liked most.  Initially we were set on keeping the Beatty out of it, but then Kian played a trick on us.  He sent us out of the room, and presented the blends to us again, but this time blind.

When we came back in the room and tasted the wines again, we still loved them.  However, being blind, we had no idea which wine was what.  Most of us were completely convinced that sample B was our Dry Creek zin with no Beatty.  We were fooled, but we knew that sample B was our favorite.  It turns out, this was the 2.5% PS / 2.5% Beatty / 95% Grist!  We were all very happy with our final blend, and left Crushpad feeling giddy with delight that our zin would be bottled in a month, for us to take home and admire.

If you would like to blend you own wine at home, check out Fusebox, a custom wine blending kit in a box!

I don't taste and tell, except for you!

February 18, 2009

As some of you might know, I am trying to be a winemaker.  No, I don’t have carboys set up in the garage, and no I’m not living in the lap of luxury in Sonoma.  I am lucky enough to live in a city that has it’s own community custom crush facility, Crushpad.

I am part of a winemaking crew where I am making a Dry Creek zinfandel with a group of people, which is one of the great services Crushpad offers.  We were blending our finished zin with a variety of components, and we were able to decide how we wanted our finished product to come out.  Initially, we tried the control sample of our 2007 Grist Vineyard Zinfandel, which is a jammy, bright, and powerful zin.  Then, we tried a control sample of some petite sirah.  Once we tasted the components, we were able to think about what proportion of Petite Sirah we wanted to add to our zin, which we were hoping would add some depth of flavor, as well as a little backbone.

First, we tried a 5% Petite Sirah and 95% Zinfandel blend.  We all agreed that this was too much, as the Petite overpowered the subtlety of the zinfandel and we lost it’s character.  Then, our consulting winemaker Kian Tavakol suggested we try a different Zinfandel.  This zin was from the Beatty Ranch on Howell Mountain in Napa.  This vineyard is at 1800 feet and offers a completely different experience from Dry Creek.  These wines have a deeper black fruit and chocolate overtone, which is absolutely amazing.  I had a sample side by side with the Grist, and while totally different, they were both amazing.

Now that we had tried the control samples, a 5% blend, and a new zinfandel, we mixed it up by adding some of the Beatty Ranch zin to the mix.  Kian guided us to do a 2.5% Beatty Ranch Zin, 2.5% Petite Sirah, and 95% Grist Zin blend, which allowed us to keep our vineyard designate on the label.  We also tried another blend, which had a bit less Petite Sirah, but no Beatty zin.  The first test was not blind, and we were having a hard time deciding what we liked most.  Initially we were set on keeping the Beatty out of it, but then Kian played a trick on us.  He sent us out of the room, and presented the blends to us again, but this time blind.

When we came back in the room and tasted the wines again, we still loved them.  However, being blind, we had no idea which wine was what.  Most of us were completely convinced that sample B was our Dry Creek zin with no Beatty.  We were fooled, but we knew that sample B was our favorite.  It turns out, this was the 2.5% PS / 2.5% Beatty / 95% Grist!  We were all very happy with our final blend, and left Crushpad feeling giddy with delight that our zin would be bottled in a month, for us to take home and admire.

If you would like to blend you own wine at home, check out Fusebox, a custom wine blending kit in a box!

I don’t taste and tell, except for you!

February 18, 2009

As some of you might know, I am trying to be a winemaker.  No, I don’t have carboys set up in the garage, and no I’m not living in the lap of luxury in Sonoma.  I am lucky enough to live in a city that has it’s own community custom crush facility, Crushpad.

I am part of a winemaking crew where I am making a Dry Creek zinfandel with a group of people, which is one of the great services Crushpad offers.  We were blending our finished zin with a variety of components, and we were able to decide how we wanted our finished product to come out.  Initially, we tried the control sample of our 2007 Grist Vineyard Zinfandel, which is a jammy, bright, and powerful zin.  Then, we tried a control sample of some petite sirah.  Once we tasted the components, we were able to think about what proportion of Petite Sirah we wanted to add to our zin, which we were hoping would add some depth of flavor, as well as a little backbone.

First, we tried a 5% Petite Sirah and 95% Zinfandel blend.  We all agreed that this was too much, as the Petite overpowered the subtlety of the zinfandel and we lost it’s character.  Then, our consulting winemaker Kian Tavakol suggested we try a different Zinfandel.  This zin was from the Beatty Ranch on Howell Mountain in Napa.  This vineyard is at 1800 feet and offers a completely different experience from Dry Creek.  These wines have a deeper black fruit and chocolate overtone, which is absolutely amazing.  I had a sample side by side with the Grist, and while totally different, they were both amazing.

Now that we had tried the control samples, a 5% blend, and a new zinfandel, we mixed it up by adding some of the Beatty Ranch zin to the mix.  Kian guided us to do a 2.5% Beatty Ranch Zin, 2.5% Petite Sirah, and 95% Grist Zin blend, which allowed us to keep our vineyard designate on the label.  We also tried another blend, which had a bit less Petite Sirah, but no Beatty zin.  The first test was not blind, and we were having a hard time deciding what we liked most.  Initially we were set on keeping the Beatty out of it, but then Kian played a trick on us.  He sent us out of the room, and presented the blends to us again, but this time blind.

When we came back in the room and tasted the wines again, we still loved them.  However, being blind, we had no idea which wine was what.  Most of us were completely convinced that sample B was our Dry Creek zin with no Beatty.  We were fooled, but we knew that sample B was our favorite.  It turns out, this was the 2.5% PS / 2.5% Beatty / 95% Grist!  We were all very happy with our final blend, and left Crushpad feeling giddy with delight that our zin would be bottled in a month, for us to take home and admire.

If you would like to blend you own wine at home, check out Fusebox, a custom wine blending kit in a box!

Hello world!

February 18, 2009

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

P.S., I love you!

February 17, 2009


What a busy wine week this is!  It’s a rough life but someone has to live it.  This Friday, the Petite Sirah lovers organization, P.S. I Love You, presents Dark & Delicious.

Dark & Delicious is a great opportunity for Petite Sirah lovers to taste over 30 wineries offerings, from many different wine regions.  To compliment this dark and brooding wine, some twenty plus restaurants, caterers, and food purveyors will be on hand to offer tasty tidbids to pair with the luscious exlixer.

Tickets are $50 if ordered in advance (hurry hurry!) and $60 at the door if they are not sold out.  I have to give a shout out to my fellow blogger and friend Sonadora of Wannabe Wino, since she graciously gave away her press tickets to me, since she cannot attend.  I look forward to discovering some bacon worthy goodness to feed my much delayed bacon friday posts!

Dark & Delicious is at Kent Rosenblum’s new baby, Rockwall Wine Company, in the former Navy Base at Alameda.  I’ll see you Friday, Feb 20th at 6pm to taste Dark & Delicious!

**Special Note: Due to the developing bushfire emergency in Australia, if you are in San Francisco, please consider going to the Vicoria Bushfire Benefit tasting at Crushpad as an alternative to Dark & Delicious if you are not a Petite Sirah fan.