Archive for the ‘wine blogging wednesday’ Category

Inspirational inspiration – WBW #57

May 14, 2009
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Oh my!  Are we here again?  Wine Blogging Wednesday already?  Oh my.  Hard to believe that a year has gone by since Robert Mondavi passed away, and a great icon – however controversial – was lost.  This month, Jeff LeFevre, of Good Grape, has asked us to find our own California Inspiration.

What is my California Inspiration?  Wow.  To be honest, I had a really hard time thinking of what to write about for this post, because I am a California native who grew up in the city closest to one of the world’s greatest wine regions.  Wine has always been a part of my life.  Growing up in San Francisco, my parents would have dinner parties and let me taste their wine.  At the time it was Gallo’s Hearty Burgundy, but hey.  It was the 70s and 80s.  Back then, these jug wines were not only all the rage, they were actually of decent quality.  As my parents moved on to more palatable pursuits, they still let me sip their libations.  Not only did this prevent me from going completely wild, it made me appreciate the local fruit.  Yes yes ok, so I’m still completely wild, but I never snuck out of the house to drink.  Or stole my parent’s liquor, or really went on a bender.  Much.

When I finally left my community college for greener pastures, I chose Sonoma State University.  Not so much for its proximity to wine country, since I really didn’t drink, but because of the psychology programs I was looking at.  Working nearly full time and going to school more than full time takes a toll on a girl however, and I quickly discovered that there were many opportunities in the Sonoma area for tasting and talking, and that *SHOCK* they were free!  A poor college student who spends $800 on books a semester does not a rich woman make, so off we went on weekday excursions to local tasting rooms.  It was during this time that I discovered the big, powerful Zinfandels of Dry Creek Valley.

During my senior year, I was lucky enough to graduation from the retail sector and strange college student jobs, to a receptionist job at a local winery sales office.  It was here where my love of the grape really took flight.  The company took a keen interest in educating their employees, and held Friday wine tastings, of their own wines as well as local wines that might be in competition.  When I left the summer job to move back to San Francisco and begin a misguided career in the employment arts, they sent me off with a case of wine and an open invitation to come back to taste.

What really inspires me is the small, family run winery, many of which are in Sonoma County.  Particular favorites of mine are Mounts Familiy Vineyards, Manzanita Creek, and the collectives at Front Street as well as Hudson Street Wineries.  As I’ve written about in the past, these small, family owned wineries exclude hospitality and know that the hey to their success is their customers.  Here, I get personal attention and am greeted like a member of the family.  No amount of overpriced cult Cabernet can ever make up for that.  For these wines, I seek out the lesser known, I travel to new regions, I spend more than I would normally spend.  This to me, is the true meaning of inspiration.

Speaking of Inspiration, I’ll close with a story of a small winery on Olivet Lane in Santa Rosa.  Inspiration Vineyards.  The little yellow house sits just off the road, surrounded by vineyards, and some larger operations like DeLoach, Hook & Ladder, Sunce, and Harvest Moon, but is a spot of calm in a sea of wine travelers.  Jon & Barbara have been making wine  on their small 4.5 acre estate in the Russian River Valley appellation.  They produce Chardonnay and Zinfandel on the property, as well as Pinot Noir and Syrah from other vineyards.  At Inspiration, they strive to produce high quality, food friendly wines at reasonable prices.  I’d say they manage that and more!

My personal favorite from Inspiration is the Pinot Noir.  Every year it is slightly different, giving me a little thrill every time I go by to taste.  If you’re lucky, you’ll get to do a side by side of vintages.  The 2005 Los Carneros Pinot Noir was a memorable experience, with a light body, which was aged in new & old French oak for 10 months. The grapes for this wine come from a small vineyard in the Los Carneros area of southern Sonoma, and they were hand tended.  This alone is inspiring to me, as it is a rare and expensive commodity in the grape market today.  I found it light and earthy, with mushroom, bright cherry and slight tobacco flavors.  It was a surprising wine with some spritz, proving that sometimes forgotten rocks can produce amazing gems.
The following vintage was a completely different wine.

The 2006 was a fruit forward, intense and bold Pinot Noir.  Jon attributes this change to a stylistic shift he made in the wine making process.  The fermentation was extended, and the wine shows big rich flavors and a dark cherry red color.  I found lavender, strawberries, dark cherries, and smoke.  Yum!

Inspiration is is open by appointment only, so be sure to call ahead.  They are however, often open on days when there are events in the area, such as Barrel Tasting and Winter Wineland,  so you might just get lucky.

The North, vs. The South – a WBW Adventure

March 18, 2009

Wine Blogging Wednesday is upon us again!  This month, Remy Charest (@remycharest) of WineCase has challenged us to restage the Civil War, in his version of North vs. South – Wine Wars.  Since Remy is based in Quebec, it’s a great theme to think about what is a classically northern varietal, or something he would find locally in Quebec, and what we find here in the Lower 48.

As I have been exploring different regions of the US as well as the world, I thought I’d use Walla Walla, WA, Napa Valley, CA, and the wines of Chile to do a North vs. South with a central tag point of Napa.

My first wine is the Forgeron Cellars – 2003 Cab Sauvignon from Columbia Valley.  The Columbia Valley AVA takes up a good chunk of eastern & central Washington and a touch of northern Oregon thrown in for good measure.  This AVA lies between the 46th & 47th parallels, which is in the same vein as Bordeaux and Burgundy.  Because of this, the wines of Columbia Valley tend to be the classic grapes, such as Cabernet Sauvignon.

This Cabernet Sauvignon has a lovely floral nose, with a touch of licorice.  It’s very fruity, and reminds me of a ripe blackberry bramble.  When I sip it, it is plush and smooth, with plum flavors a strong component.  It is a velvety wine, with a long lingering finish that has bright berry fruit.  I am REALLY enjoying this wine, because while it is a Cab, it’s not heavy.  It’s rich without being over done.  At $30, it’s an affordable luxury, and I thank Catie (@walla2winewoman) at the Wild Walla Walla Wine Woman for the great recommendation!

The 2nd wine hails from Napa Valley, one of the world’s best known wine regions for Cabernet Sauvignon.  The 2005 Levendi Sweetwater Ranch Cabernet Sauvignon was a party favor that I received after last year’s Wine Blogger’s Conference, at a party hosted by The Wine Spies to introduce us to this producer. The Sweetwater Ranch is located in the Oak Knoll District of Napa Valley, adjacent to the Stags Leap District. Since Stags Leap has been producing some of the best known cabs for years, I would expect that this would also be a delicious example.

The first thing you notice is that this wine comes in half bottles.  This is great for us single folk, since we can crack it open without worrying about how to store the wine until we finish it.  It had rich aromas of leather and tobacco, with dark fruit.  This is what I would expect from a Napa cab.  It was darker and richer than the Washington Cab, and much chewier with a lot of black fruit , fig, plums and black cherries followed by a finish of black licorice.  I really liked this wine, and it retails for $52 in the 750ml bottle.

Finally, I worked my way to Chile, to taste some of the new world wines that are coming out of these.  The interesting about Chile, is that a lot of Old World producers, as well as some from California, are looking to this up and coming growing regions for a change and a challenge.  To that end, I received two samples from an agency representing the wines of Chile.

The first was produced by Domaines Barons de Rothchild Lafite, and I expected it to be a New World representation of an old, and Old World, producer.  The 2007 Los Vascos comes from Colchagua Valley. The Colchagua Valley lies about 80 miles southwest of Santiago.  It’s a wide valley, and has a Mediterranean climate.  It has often been compared to Napa, so I expected that the wine would taste like Napa cab.

Sadly, I was dissapointed.  The Los Vascos Cabernet Sauvignon was thin and bitter, with no real depth.  While it’s possible that this bottle was off, I did have it with food and it just had no substance.  At $10, I think I could do better.

So I went on to open my 2nd Chilean Cabernet, 2007 Marques Casa Concha, fromthe Maipo Valley region.  The Maipo is one of Chile’s warmest growing regions, with temperatures regularly getting above 90 in the summer.  While this might seem like Napa at first glace, their winters are much milder.  Cabernet Sauvignon is the largest planting in Maipo.

The Casa Marques Casa Concha exhibited the ripe fruitiness in a similar way to the Forgeron Cellars, with bright cherry fruit and a large firm body.  I tasted tons of cherry fruit, chocolate, blackberry, and bit of wood smoke.  This wine got better and better as the night went on, and at $15, I would highly recommend this is a value Cabernet.  Even though I don’t eat steak, I can see how this would be great with a hamburger or a portabello burger!  It had an exceptionally smooth finish, that lingered and made my taste buds happy.

Wine! It’s what’s for breakfast!

January 13, 2009

This month, for Wine Blogging Wednesday,   El Jefe, of Twisted Oak Winery and El Bloggo Torcido asked us to to tell him what wines we’d eat with breakfast.  OK, so more specifically, breakfast foods.  The difficult part was he ix-nayed the use of anything sweet or bubbly, the traditionally breakfast or brunch pairing.

My favorite drinking buddy and fellow wine blogger, Liza of the Brix Chicks (@brixchick_liza), graciously decided to host us at her house for a smorgasbord of breakfast items!  Also in attendance were Marshall (@wineq) of WineQ, Lisa de Bruin (@winedivergirl) of California Wine Life and Hahn Estates, and a friend of Liza’s.

First off, we started with a sparkling red. OK OK so we weren’t suppose to go there, but Lisa brought this Chandon Sparkling Red, which is made of Zin and Pinot, and I thought it was interesting.  It seemed a little bit like Welch’s grape juice, and also had flavors of black cherries and plums.  We paired this with the Amuse a la BrixChick, which was a date, stuffed with creme fraiche and a reduction syrup made with Hahn Meritage.

Next up, we had a silky egg custard with mushrooms.  We tried to pair this a forest floor style pinot, but ended up withe a fruitier Savannah Chanelle pinot instead.  The pairing didn’t quite work, so we kep drinking the Chandon Sparkling Red instead.

Then, we moved on to delicious savory waffles, topped with a smoked salmon ceviche style, which was truly amazing.  We paired this with the Hahn SLH Pinot Gris, and the citrus zing of the wine really complimented the salmon.  This was a huge winner in my book.  I have previously reviewed the Pinot Gris in our Hahn Twitter Taste Live, and I found tons of citrus which really balances the smoked salmon, combined with a nice round mouthfeel.

Now, we had the bacon course of course!  This was no ordinary bacon course, and Liza put together fresh baked croissants, bacon, a tomato coulis,  and greens.  We slathered fresh brie on the croissants and went to town building our bacon towers.  This was paired with El Jefe’s own The Spainard, a blend of Tempranillo, Garnacha and Graciano.  I really love this wine.  I mean really, really love this wine.  The smokiness of the bacon brought out the earthly goodness of The Spainard, and this was the first bottle we wrung out hoping to get a few more drops.  The Spaniard gives off a powerful aroma of smoky blackberries sprinkled with baking spices, and a whiff of your leather jacket.  It tasted like crushed blue fruit, and those same baking spices, with an earthy note to the finish.  This is a huge wine and held up well to the rich BBLT.

Next, we had Brioche French Toast with more of that amazing Meritage syrup, whipped cream and a poached pear.  We paired this with the Hahn Meritage, again reviewd at the Hahn Twitter Taste Live.   While this still isn’t my favorite wine, the pairing with the richness of the french toast and the reduction was lovely. The fruity flavor of the wine played off of the creamy brioche, and I had a very happy taste bud that day.

For dessert, we had some delicious cheeses paired with Penfolds Grandfathers Port which sealed the deal for pickling our merry crew.  I’d review it but well, I was lost in the heaven of it’s deliciosuness!

This was a fun event, and I look forward to more breakfast foods with wine!  Mushrooms in particular go quite well with earthly pinot noirs, and I”d love to pair some more syrahs with bacon.  Additionally, Bagels & Lox are calling my name with osme more lovely whites!  Wine can definately be paired, and paired well, with breakfast foods.

Happy eating, and I hope you try your own pairings soon!

Wine! It's what's for breakfast!

January 13, 2009

This month, for Wine Blogging Wednesday,   El Jefe, of Twisted Oak Winery and El Bloggo Torcido asked us to to tell him what wines we’d eat with breakfast.  OK, so more specifically, breakfast foods.  The difficult part was he ix-nayed the use of anything sweet or bubbly, the traditionally breakfast or brunch pairing.

My favorite drinking buddy and fellow wine blogger, Liza of the Brix Chicks (@brixchick_liza), graciously decided to host us at her house for a smorgasbord of breakfast items!  Also in attendance were Marshall (@wineq) of WineQ, Lisa de Bruin (@winedivergirl) of California Wine Life and Hahn Estates, and a friend of Liza’s.

First off, we started with a sparkling red. OK OK so we weren’t suppose to go there, but Lisa brought this Chandon Sparkling Red, which is made of Zin and Pinot, and I thought it was interesting.  It seemed a little bit like Welch’s grape juice, and also had flavors of black cherries and plums.  We paired this with the Amuse a la BrixChick, which was a date, stuffed with creme fraiche and a reduction syrup made with Hahn Meritage.

Next up, we had a silky egg custard with mushrooms.  We tried to pair this a forest floor style pinot, but ended up withe a fruitier Savannah Chanelle pinot instead.  The pairing didn’t quite work, so we kep drinking the Chandon Sparkling Red instead.

Then, we moved on to delicious savory waffles, topped with a smoked salmon ceviche style, which was truly amazing.  We paired this with the Hahn SLH Pinot Gris, and the citrus zing of the wine really complimented the salmon.  This was a huge winner in my book.  I have previously reviewed the Pinot Gris in our Hahn Twitter Taste Live, and I found tons of citrus which really balances the smoked salmon, combined with a nice round mouthfeel.

Now, we had the bacon course of course!  This was no ordinary bacon course, and Liza put together fresh baked croissants, bacon, a tomato coulis,  and greens.  We slathered fresh brie on the croissants and went to town building our bacon towers.  This was paired with El Jefe’s own The Spainard, a blend of Tempranillo, Garnacha and Graciano.  I really love this wine.  I mean really, really love this wine.  The smokiness of the bacon brought out the earthly goodness of The Spainard, and this was the first bottle we wrung out hoping to get a few more drops.  The Spaniard gives off a powerful aroma of smoky blackberries sprinkled with baking spices, and a whiff of your leather jacket.  It tasted like crushed blue fruit, and those same baking spices, with an earthy note to the finish.  This is a huge wine and held up well to the rich BBLT.

Next, we had Brioche French Toast with more of that amazing Meritage syrup, whipped cream and a poached pear.  We paired this with the Hahn Meritage, again reviewd at the Hahn Twitter Taste Live.   While this still isn’t my favorite wine, the pairing with the richness of the french toast and the reduction was lovely. The fruity flavor of the wine played off of the creamy brioche, and I had a very happy taste bud that day.

For dessert, we had some delicious cheeses paired with Penfolds Grandfathers Port which sealed the deal for pickling our merry crew.  I’d review it but well, I was lost in the heaven of it’s deliciosuness!

This was a fun event, and I look forward to more breakfast foods with wine!  Mushrooms in particular go quite well with earthly pinot noirs, and I”d love to pair some more syrahs with bacon.  Additionally, Bagels & Lox are calling my name with osme more lovely whites!  Wine can definately be paired, and paired well, with breakfast foods.

Happy eating, and I hope you try your own pairings soon!

Wine! It's what's for breakfast!

January 13, 2009

This month, for Wine Blogging Wednesday,   El Jefe, of Twisted Oak Winery and El Bloggo Torcido asked us to to tell him what wines we’d eat with breakfast.  OK, so more specifically, breakfast foods.  The difficult part was he ix-nayed the use of anything sweet or bubbly, the traditionally breakfast or brunch pairing.

My favorite drinking buddy and fellow wine blogger, Liza of the Brix Chicks (@brixchick_liza), graciously decided to host us at her house for a smorgasbord of breakfast items!  Also in attendance were Marshall (@wineq) of WineQ, Lisa de Bruin (@winedivergirl) of California Wine Life and Hahn Estates, and a friend of Liza’s.

First off, we started with a sparkling red. OK OK so we weren’t suppose to go there, but Lisa brought this Chandon Sparkling Red, which is made of Zin and Pinot, and I thought it was interesting.  It seemed a little bit like Welch’s grape juice, and also had flavors of black cherries and plums.  We paired this with the Amuse a la BrixChick, which was a date, stuffed with creme fraiche and a reduction syrup made with Hahn Meritage.

Next up, we had a silky egg custard with mushrooms.  We tried to pair this a forest floor style pinot, but ended up withe a fruitier Savannah Chanelle pinot instead.  The pairing didn’t quite work, so we kep drinking the Chandon Sparkling Red instead.

Then, we moved on to delicious savory waffles, topped with a smoked salmon ceviche style, which was truly amazing.  We paired this with the Hahn SLH Pinot Gris, and the citrus zing of the wine really complimented the salmon.  This was a huge winner in my book.  I have previously reviewed the Pinot Gris in our Hahn Twitter Taste Live, and I found tons of citrus which really balances the smoked salmon, combined with a nice round mouthfeel.

Now, we had the bacon course of course!  This was no ordinary bacon course, and Liza put together fresh baked croissants, bacon, a tomato coulis,  and greens.  We slathered fresh brie on the croissants and went to town building our bacon towers.  This was paired with El Jefe’s own The Spainard, a blend of Tempranillo, Garnacha and Graciano.  I really love this wine.  I mean really, really love this wine.  The smokiness of the bacon brought out the earthly goodness of The Spainard, and this was the first bottle we wrung out hoping to get a few more drops.  The Spaniard gives off a powerful aroma of smoky blackberries sprinkled with baking spices, and a whiff of your leather jacket.  It tasted like crushed blue fruit, and those same baking spices, with an earthy note to the finish.  This is a huge wine and held up well to the rich BBLT.

Next, we had Brioche French Toast with more of that amazing Meritage syrup, whipped cream and a poached pear.  We paired this with the Hahn Meritage, again reviewd at the Hahn Twitter Taste Live.   While this still isn’t my favorite wine, the pairing with the richness of the french toast and the reduction was lovely. The fruity flavor of the wine played off of the creamy brioche, and I had a very happy taste bud that day.

For dessert, we had some delicious cheeses paired with Penfolds Grandfathers Port which sealed the deal for pickling our merry crew.  I’d review it but well, I was lost in the heaven of it’s deliciosuness!

This was a fun event, and I look forward to more breakfast foods with wine!  Mushrooms in particular go quite well with earthly pinot noirs, and I”d love to pair some more syrahs with bacon.  Additionally, Bagels & Lox are calling my name with osme more lovely whites!  Wine can definately be paired, and paired well, with breakfast foods.

Happy eating, and I hope you try your own pairings soon!

Is it Chile in here, or is it just me?

December 11, 2008

This month, Wine Blogging Wednesday‘s host, Tim of Cheap Wine Ratings challenged us to find a Chilean Red under $20.  Not having had many Chilean wines period, I was curious so I headed over to good old Cost Plus (World Market to you crazy people on the East Coast) and picked up two red blends.

The first is the 2005 Nomad Red Wine, from the Central Valley region.  This is actually an effort by a California winemaker, known for his efforts at Domaine Carneros.  TJ Evans, who partnered with two other meandering winemakers, Jeffrey Jarvis, a small vineyard owner here in California, and Jessica Tomei who is the importer.

The blend of Cabernet Sauvingon, Syrah, Carmenere and a touch of Malbec grapes was produced from grapes from all over Chile, but primarily Maipo Valley.  This is a very big wine.  It is inky black in the glass, and very earthy.  The smokey character of the Malbec & Carmenere really show through.  I am tasting a lot of smokey meats, and blue fruit like ripe plums as well as tobacco and a touch of leather sprinkled with black pepper and allspice.

This wine was $13.99 at Cost Plus and for the money, it was a great buy with excellent QPR.  If you like a big Bordeaux style blend, I would highly recommend it, especially with a meat dish for dinner.

The second wine that I piced up was another red blend.  Hey, I was on a theme!  This was also from Cost Plus, and was $11.99.  The 2005 Calcu is a blend of 60% Cab Sav, 20% Cab Franc, and 20% Carmenere.  According to their label, a Calcu is a magician, and the magic is here in this interesting blend from the Colchagua Valley region of Chile.

This blend also has a very dark purple color, and has a dusty blackberry characteristic that I attribute to the Cab Franc.  Smokey meat flavors are held firmly by the tannins.  The finish on this wine keeps on going and going and going!  There is a lot of anise immediately on the first sip, followed by roasted figs.  There is an olive like end note that pops up after you think all of the flavor is gone.  There is some oak on the wine but it is not overpowering.

I will keep looking for great buys from Chile and I encourage you to RUN not walk to pick up the Nomad!

In Celebration of no more Shrubbery!

September 16, 2008

Yes yes I’m a day late, and a dollar short. That said, this month, we have a special theme for Wine Blogging Wednesday #49.

In light on the current political climate and the impending election, David Honig of 2 Days Per Bottle has asked us to toast to the end of this madness we call the Bush era.

What will I drink to toast this momentous occasion? It certainly will not be something to honor the President, although I will be celebrating his demise.

If Obama wins the election, as I hope he does, I will be toasting with a lovely bottle of Champagne. The current candidate is Perrier-Jouët NV Brut, which my friend Liza the Brix Chick brought over to my house before an event on Sunday. In this tasty sparkler, I found creamy toast, hazelnuts, and a lemony backnote. Ahhh refreshign!

IF however, my worst nightmare comes true and McLame & Caribou Barbie win this freak show, I will be drowning my sorrows in some good single malt scotch as I drive up to the border to escape. My favorite single malt thse days is Glenmorangie Sherry Cask, but that, is another blog post me thinks!

Happy drinking!

Wine Blogging Wednesday #48, Back to our ROOTS!

August 13, 2008

It being the Olympics, when I think of Roots, I think of those silly berets they made us wear the last time around. That said, I was looking forward to this WBW because Lenn asked us to “get back to our roots”.

When first reading the theme, one might think I was going to go to the grocery store and stock up on Sutter Home White Zinfandel (and no Lenn, that is NOT really wine it is Cool Aid for mommies) or Almaden Chablis, but no! I strongly protest! For me, my roots are in Sonoma County.

Growing up in the Bay Area, my family would often take weekend drives up the coast, or in to Petaluma to look at the chickens. Yes, we city girls know what chickens look like. When I got older, I decided to go to college in Sonoma, since it was just far enough away from home for me to not kill my parents, but close enough to the city to have some fun.

That being said, I was first exposed to wine when working for Windsor Vineyards one summer. Granted, it was only in the office and was not terribly exciting since I was the receptionist in their corporate sales office, buy hey – we had weekly wine tastings! Since I wasn’t a huge drinker in college, this was eye opening for me. What better way to prompt the sales team to sell custom labels for corporate gifts than by getting them liquored up! Poor fools didn’t know what they were in for. Once I started drinking wine, I never stopped; as my parting gift at the end of the summer, they gave me a case of wine to go. Not bad!

When I moved back to the city, I was broke and making $10 an hour. Needless to say my habit for Long Island Ice Teas was not supported on such a meager income. I ask you, what can you do that is free, but allows you to enjoy the fruits of nature? Wine tasting of course! Thus began my weekly forays in to Sonoma Valley and Dry Creek Valley to imbibe in the good juice. In the 90s, Sonoma was still up and coming and no one, I mean NO ONE charged for tasting. Since my friends and I were all broke, there was nothing finer than a free glass of wine-a!

One of the first wineries that stole my heart was Peterson, nestled between Dry Creek Valley and Alexander Valley. Before it moved in to it’s current digs on Dry Creek Road, Peterson would occasionally open it’s barn doors and share it’s wine right out of the barn door. I instantly fell in love with it’s “I’m going to make wine my way and I don’t care” attitude, as well as the rich, jammy zinfandels Peterson produces. As a newly minted wine drinker, the full bodies and slightly sweet style of red wine is easy to love. Many of these wines lack some complexity, but are thoroughly enjoyable as sipping wines. Fortunately, as my palate matured, so did many of these wines. You can now find a vast array of complex, spicy, fruity wines all over the valley at every price point.

For this Wine Blogging Wednesday, I cracked open the 2004 Bernier Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel. I had picked up this bottle a couple of weeks ago on a whim, since I hadn’t tasted Peterson’s zins in a while. Classic in it’s Dry Creek characteristics, there were tons of blackberry brambles kissed by Oak, with lush jammy flavors wafting up from my glass. This wine was purchased at the winery for $26 but can be found elsewhere for as little as $20.

While my current infatuation has been with Pinot Noir, my budget has been impacted by gas prices and I have had to curtail my wine spending a tad. It’s great to knwo that you can still pick up a decent bottle of zin for under $50!

Wine Blogging Wednesday Anniversary Edition!

July 18, 2008

You know the drill. Once a month, your fellow wineaux and bloggers are handed a theme from the heavens above, and we drink. Then we write.

This month, it is the 4 year anniversary of Wine Blogging Wednesday, started by our Fearless Leader Lenn Thompson of Lenndevours.

For this anniversary edition, Lenn is asking us to go back to our drinking roots, and find that wine that got us to fall in love with Bacchus, or something you used to drink a lot of when you were young and impressionable. Please try to avoid the Boone’s Farm or Sutter Home however!


Come over, do it alone, find a Meetup, but do it!
Post your replies on the WBW site, email Lenn or Twitter it by August 13th, and you can share your notes with the other bloggerati out there.

Wine Blogging Wednesday #47 Brought to you by the Letter S!

July 10, 2008

So I’m a day behind – I totally forgot that Wine Blogging Wednesday has come and gone!
The regular posse was assembled for a truly Stupendous tasting.

You can see all the details here, but suffice it to say that Syrah won our little “S” hearts.

thanks everyone for participating, and next month we’ll pare down the craziness. I hope.
Maybe.